Revenge of the BLACK KITTEN CLAN!

shear-in-spuh-rey-shuhn:  art by MATTHEW C. BARRETT



from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul
(via: Juxtapoz)
from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul

(via: Juxtapoz)

from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul
(via: Juxtapoz)
from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul

(via: Juxtapoz)



from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul
(via: Juxtapoz)
from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul

(via: Juxtapoz)

from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39
by Frank Rudolph Paul
(via: Juxtapoz)

from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul

(via: Juxtapoz)


from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39
by Frank Rudolph Paul
(via: Juxtapoz)

from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul

(via: Juxtapoz)

from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39
by Frank Rudolph Paul
(via: Juxtapoz)

from the series: Life on Other Planets, 1936-39

by Frank Rudolph Paul

(via: Juxtapoz)

The artist concept depicts multiple-transiting planet systems, which are stars with more than one planet. The planets eclipse or transit their host star from the vantage point of the observer. This angle is called edge-on.
Image Credit: NASA

The artist concept depicts multiple-transiting planet systems, which are stars with more than one planet. The planets eclipse or transit their host star from the vantage point of the observer. This angle is called edge-on.

Image Credit: NASA

gttrmgc:

Combined the requests of “astronaut monkey” and “astronaut eating mexican food”.

gttrmgc:

Combined the requests of “astronaut monkey” and “astronaut eating mexican food”.

Life on Mars
These three illustrations were made by an artist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1975 and reflect then-current ideas about our neighboring planet. Mars orbits the sun at a greater distance than Earth and is much colder. It has a thin atmosphere with a lot of carbon dioxide and is very dry. Not a good place for Earthly life.
These images may have been influenced by scientists who thought Martian life might have been silicon-based, rather than carbon-based as on Earth. The stumpy life-forms are all fairly simple, and look a bit like 1970s-era home furnishings.
Illustrations: NASA/JPL 
(via: Wired Science)

Life on Mars

These three illustrations were made by an artist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1975 and reflect then-current ideas about our neighboring planet. Mars orbits the sun at a greater distance than Earth and is much colder. It has a thin atmosphere with a lot of carbon dioxide and is very dry. Not a good place for Earthly life.

These images may have been influenced by scientists who thought Martian life might have been silicon-based, rather than carbon-based as on Earth. The stumpy life-forms are all fairly simple, and look a bit like 1970s-era home furnishings.

Illustrations: NASA/JPL

(via: Wired Science)

total eclipse.

total eclipse.

Happy Holidays, Soviet Space Race Style!
Beginning in the late 1950s with the launch of Sputnik, spaceflight often featured in Soviet holiday cards. The Soviet Communists were officially atheists, but they kept St. Nick and many of the trappings of Christmas by shifting them over to the Orthodox New Year. Christmas trees, for example, became New Year trees. In the holiday card above, a cosmonaut helps a Russian Santa with his holiday duties. The spacecraft is, of course, entirely fanciful; it looks like something from a fairground ride. As we will see tomorrow, Soviet-era holiday cards often featured real spacecraft.
(via: Wired Science)

Happy Holidays, Soviet Space Race Style!

Beginning in the late 1950s with the launch of Sputnik, spaceflight often featured in Soviet holiday cards. The Soviet Communists were officially atheists, but they kept St. Nick and many of the trappings of Christmas by shifting them over to the Orthodox New Year. Christmas trees, for example, became New Year trees. In the holiday card above, a cosmonaut helps a Russian Santa with his holiday duties. The spacecraft is, of course, entirely fanciful; it looks like something from a fairground ride. As we will see tomorrow, Soviet-era holiday cards often featured real spacecraft.

(via: Wired Science)